April 20 : Sandhurst to Sandhurst (Kent) : Forest Row to Withyham

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here.


It was a ‘short’ walk today, just 6 miles, as we had an evening engagement. And an easy walk too, as virtually all of it was along an old railway line, the Forest Way http://www.eastsussex.gov.uk/leisureandtourism/countryside/walks/forestway

We caught the 291 Metrobus to Forest Row, walked out of the village, collecting the first cache of the day, a black-tape covered pot under a lump of concrete (we would see quite a lot of those!) and we were up on the old line. It was a Thursday and we were expecting it to be quiet, but the path was full of walkers, dogs, joggers, and cyclists, some out for a stroll, and some using the old track as a route to somewhere else. As we cleared the outskirts of Forest Row, the people thinned out and we were nearly alone, save for cyclists, for this is also long-distance cycleway 21, 94 miles from Greenwich to Eastbourne http://www.sustrans.org.uk/ncn/map/route/route-21 and also part of the Avenue Verte which links London to Paris via the Newhaven-Dieppe ferry.

Forest Way aka Cycle route 21 aka Avenue Verte

Forest Way aka Cycle route 21 aka Avenue Verte


And the geocaches … well, there are a lot of excellent cache series around here, which weave in and out of each other. We found caches from the Forest Row, Hartfield, and Withyham Link series, and the Pooh Trail (for this is part of Ashdown Forest, home of Winnie the Pooh, Piglet and Eeyore). Almost the caches were film pots, hidden under bricks, lumps of concrete, or railway clinker, and were very easy to find, but that didn’t matter at all, for it was a glorious spring day with the trees frothing into leaf, bluebells in flower at the side of the track, and spring bursting out all over.
Winnie the Pooh country!

Winnie the Pooh country!


After about four miles walk along the railway, we approached Hartfield, and took a short diversion into the village http://www.hartfieldonline.com As we walked uphill from the old railway line and the valley of the infant River Medway, we were overtaken by six teenagers with huge rucksacks. Aha! Duke of Edinburgh award time again! The village is compact and attractive, with timber and tile-hung houses, and the first oast house we had seen. We were obviously approaching Kent at last!
The first oast house of the walk

The first oast house of the walk


Hartfield church sits atop the hill. We chose this as a good spot to eat lunch, on a seat in the churchyard in the warm spring sun, listening to the children in the adjoining school. We meandered back through the village, passing the pub http://www.anchorhartfield.com and the village shop, then returning to the railway line near the disused Hartfield station, now a private house.
Hartfield Church

Hartfield Church

Unusual local sports!

Unusual local sports!


It was now only a couple of miles to Withyham. Leaving the railway line at another disused station, we walked the short distance back to the geocar for the drive home. Eighteen caches found, and a lovely walk in the Sussex countryside.

Here are some of the caches we found:

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