December 9 : Yateley

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here.

On a frosty, crisp, sunny winter’s morning, we decided to get out into the fresh air and do a spot of caching. Mr Hg137 had spotted six caches, close together, a short drive away that all appeared to be well thought of by previous finders. (Editor’s note: you can award a ‘favourite’ point to a cache that you especially enjoy – for the location, for the cache container, or for any especially fun aspect of the cache. )


Having parked the geocar, we set off up Cricket Hill Lane for our first cache, ‘Pond View’. Both of us have driven along this road many times and have both failed to spot the little wildlife pond and the wooden carvings of various animals and plants. Geocaching does take you to new places … or makes you see familiar ones in a new light … The cache was nearby, in a container made from natural materials that blended well into the background.


Turning off the main road onto a narrow lane, we were immediately past the edge of Yateley and into countryside, and soon reached our next target, ‘Leap Of Faith’. We weren’t sure what that might imply, but it turned out to involve a large tree, lots of roots, many fallen leaves, and a bit of scrambling up and down a bank. After lots of searching, the cache was uncovered in a spot that both of us had already searched. Oh well. A little further on was ‘Outpost’, a cache with a hint that said (‘title should do it”). So we searched every conceivable object that could possibly be the place, but without success. (Editor’s note: the cache had gone missing and has subsequently been replaced.)

Can't find that cache!

Can’t find that cache!

Next up was ‘Long Forgotten St Barnabas’. Until 1980 a corrugated iron chapel (aka ‘Tin Tabernacle’) stood near here, and the cache name commemorates this. http://yateleylocalhistory.pbworks.com/f/TiceReminiscencesA5Bookletformat.pdf (Editor’s note: my – limited – local knowledge has just expanded a little.) Anyway, the actual cache wasn’t made of tin, but was another of those clever items built out of natural materials that blend seamlessly into the area around them. More rootling in trees and bushes, and we found it.

We crossed the road and set off up Prior’s Lane. Most of the roads around here seem to be called ‘Lane’ regardless of how large or small, busy or quiet they are! This one was both small and quiet, a narrow road that passed a few houses, became a track and then a footpath. Along here were our last two caches of the day. The first, ‘Crossword’ was somewhere outside a scout hut, where all the clues were in the puzzle supplied in the cache description. We arrived at the destination and surveyed various likely items. One kept catching my eye. It just looked … overconstructed … for what it needed to be. I prodded it and felt it and tried to find loose bits, and eventually something moved, and there was the cache. Well done to the cache setter – we’ve never seen one quite like that before.
(Editor’s note: it’s hard to describe caches without spoiling it for future finders! There is much, much more that I could have said here.)
(Editor’s note 2: a picture of this cache will very likely appear in our end of year post ‘Caches of the Year’ where we show some of the most interesting, exciting, unusual, or just plain daft caches that we have come across.)

Then it was time to find our last cache of the day, ‘Old Man Dawson’ (no, we don’t know who he was!). We had to determine some numbers – we had done the research on that beforehand – and then use those to open the cache. We arrived at the appointed place. I searched briefly and unsuccessfully at the foot of a tree. Mr Hg137 fell about laughing, and pointed to an item at about chest height. Doh! The cache was right there in plain view. And then it was just a matter of applying those numbers and opening the cache, simple enough, except that it was quite stiff and I broke a nail while opening it. Doh again!

And that was it for the morning. Five out of six caches found and time for a late lunch.

Here are some of the caches we found:

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