February 26 : Englefield Green

Englefield Green is a large village sandwiched between Windsor Great Park, Egham and Staines-upon-Thames.

We attempted 10 caches in three separate locations within the village; these locations were over a mile apart so we moved our car between each.

St Judes, Englefield Green

Our first location, centred around the village centre, involved finding 3 Church Micros. The first two, were combined as a Church Micro Twin. The two churches (St Andrews, a Greek Orthodox Church and St Judes, Church of England) each had three waypoints to find – with degrees of overlap between them. We walked between the waypoints, and wrote down numbers making sure we kept the two sets apart.

St Andrew’s, Englefield Green

However when we undertook the two calculations we realised we’d gone wrong! We’d misinterpreted our findings from the Greek Church, so we re-calculated and arrived at two more plausible locations.

We were still unsure of our calculations, so we proceeded to the nearest location, and after a but of rummaging found the cache. Inside the Tupperware box, was a beautiful and apt log holder.

This gave us confidence walk to the location of the second cache. It was hidden some distance from the Churches, passing by a residential area on the outskirts of the village. A quick find meant we could head for our third Church Micro (the Church of the Assumption of our Lady, Catholic).

The Church of the Assumption of Our Lady, Englefield Green

Here we looked for 2 adjacent benches to acquire some dates. However one of the benches had been moved, and it took us a few minutes to find it. The benches did give a good opportunity for an early lunch, and a good spot to work out the final cache co-ordinates. An easy find at what was a very apposite spot for a Church Micro.

Open countryside

We returned to the car and moved it to the Village Green area of Englefield Green. Here we would undertake a 1-2 mile walk in the countryside attempting to locate 6 caches. These were all standard caches – no multi calculations to undertake. This walk was very pleasurable, at times the traffic noise from the A30 and M25 were inaudible. Few, if any houses, were in view – we could have been far out in the country, instead of the extreme outskirts of London.

A ‘Little Bridge’ – but where is the cache?

The caches were, on the whole, fairly straightforward finds. The easiest was by a stile, completely uncovered.

Three were hidden in woodland, where on each occasion our GPS wobbled and we walked around in a several spirals until we arrived at the appropriate hiding place. The remaining two are best described as being attached to ‘poles and pipes’ ! All six caches were fairly standard cache containers… with one exception…a mouse!

Our last cache, was another short drive away. It was hidden just outside the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede. We didn’t have time to visit the Memorial itself (it lists all 20000 members of the air Services lost during WWII) but we did pause to remember the fallen by the entrance gates. (Our pause was slightly enforced, as two large lorries were vying for road-space in a relatively narrow lane, near where we were standing!).

Air Forces Memorial, Runnymede

The cache yielded an interesting trackable, Wood. There was an object connected to Wood – a helicopter. We weren’t sure whether to take the trackable or not (since it was in an apt location), but we did and we will blog about its adventures shortly.

So 10 caches attempted and 10 found. Three church micros undertaken and a pleasant walk in the country too.

Here are some of the caches we found :


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February 15 : Weston Patrick – the return – a warm day in Hampshire

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here.

On the first Saturday in of 2019, we attempted a caching walk round Weston Patrick, south of Basingstoke. It was cold, very cold, and bleak, very bleak, with a damp wind that gradually seeped into the bones. We gave up halfway round, cold and miserable.

Six weeks later, we parked in the same place as before and started to retrace our steps, in reverse order, around the second half of the Weston Patrick (WP) series. But weren’t we in a different season? The sky was blue, not grey, the sun was warm, though there was still frost in the shadows, and there was a gentle, soft breeze, not a biting, cold wind. We set off to enjoy the walk, in sparkling, early spring sunshine, with skylarks singing overhead.




We skirted Weston Patrick village/hamlet on paths and a sunken lane, then walked gently uphill on a track between freshly cut hedges. When the track ran out the path continued along a field edge, then into woods. As we went, we paused to rummage in prickly hedges, behind trees, under stones, searching for geocaches, and mostly finding them. There were some interesting caches here, some hanging, some camouflaged, some attached by magnets, with a variety of containers and log books and a couple with ‘oooh’ Halloween-ish frissons.

I bite!

I bite!


The frost was all gone by now, and it was nicely warm. After bypassing a large tree, fallen across the path, we stopped for coffee. Nearby was – umm – a dead pigeon wedged into the cleft of a branch, probably a future meal for a local bird of prey. Mr Hg137 said that I should search it for a cache. I declined …
Blocked path ...

Blocked path …


By late morning, we’d reached the ‘last’ cache in the series (last for us, we’d now attempted all the others). It was hidden somewhere in grown-up hazel coppicing. Could we find it? No! One tree looks very much like another and we gave up after searching what seemed like the while plantation. (Editor’s note: no one else has found it since us, perhaps it has gone missing.)
So many trees, all alike ...

So many trees, all alike …


Next was a diversion to find a single cache, ‘Baymans Lane’, not part of any series. The best route seemed to be along some tracks, that didn’t appear on our map. It turns out that these are private service roads for the Humbly Grove oilfield. But no-one spotted us …

After a picnic lunch, we debated on the best route back to the geocar. Should we retrace our way back round the first half of the WP series, looking for any caches we missed on our first visit? Or should we head back on a bridleway through the woods to find another solitary cache? We decided on the second of these, as it would mean searching for a different cache, not a re-search of somewhere we’d been earlier. This was a nice idea, and a very pleasant walk in the sunshine through more woods and fields, but it had two flaws: First flaw: we couldn’t find the cache (it’s quite old, seldom visited, left over from a caching event) : Second flaw: we didn’t realise, but we might have bumped into other cachers if we had chosen the other way.

On our return to the geocar, there was now a second car parked alongside it. It’s a tiny lay-by, out in the country – hmm – more cachers? Our hunch was correct as we logged the caches and read our logs interspersed with those from biscuit_girl. She was much more dedicated than us, completing the whole series, starting in daylight and finishing as it got dark. Here is her review of the series, which sums it up better than I can:

What a wonderful series! We have thoroughly enjoyed our walk round this afternoon and we only logged 5 DNFs. I think this might be my best day of caching yet! The weather was lovely and the scenery picture postcard perfect of the English countryside. We even got to see the moon as we made our way back to the car. Today I’ve managed to lose a hat, break my sunglasses, seen a dead pigeon (frankly this was very spooky and put me off the search at that GZ!) and my feet are a little sore! But I’ve had the most wonderful day … It was so peaceful and I enjoyed all the well thought out and interesting hides and containers. Thank you so much to the CO for setting out and maintaining this lovely series, a favourite point given ❤️ … don’t think I’ve walked that far in ages!

Here are some of the caches we found. Some of the others will appear in our ‘caches of the year’ post later on.

February 9 : Brainwork needed for National Series caches in Bagshot

Bagshot is only a few miles from home, we’d never cached there and with Storm Erik due to blow in bad weather later, it seemed the ideal place to go.

St Anne’s Church, Bagshot


We were attempting 6 caches and all of them (unusually) were part of National Series :

– 2 were Church Micro caches (numbers 186 and 1326)
– 1 was a War Memorial cache (number 618)
– 1 was a Postcode cache (number 90)
– 1 was a Drinking Fountain/Trough (number 26)

The Centre of Bagshot

Of the six caches only one was a standard cache (the post code cache). The coordinates for this were very exact, and – apart from being in a very public space,opposite a supermarket on a Saturday morning (!) – should have been a straightforward find. It did though take us two attempts to find the magnetic nano hidden under some street furniture.

Where is this ?


Two of the other caches were mystery caches. One (the Drinking Fountain) involved finding a Drinking Fountain/Trough in Bagshot – from a picture, and then finding a cache nearby. Mr Hg137 has driven by the Trough on many occasions, but had never seen it! (Probably concentrating on his driving … is his excuse!)

The other mystery cache was one of the Church Micros. The only information we had, was that the cache was within 100 metres of the supplied coordinates. We both walked 100 metres in opposite directions searching any appropriate hiding place. When we met up minutes later, we hadn’t found the cache. Mrs Hg137 had then read a few logs, and this sparked Mr Hg137’s brain into overdrive as suddenly the hint became clear. Disappointingly Mr Hg137 had been very close to the cache minutes before.. and while Mrs Hg137 was still mentioning other logs, Mr Hg137 purposefully strode to the cache!

A pleasant change from pavements!


The three other caches were multis. Two were very simple – visit one location transcribe a few numbers, calculate a new set of coordinates.

Bagshot’s War Memorial

Simple! Well, simple for one cache… as it led down a small footpath to a quick find.

St Anne’s Chapel


As for the other simple cache…our maths was correct…but our transcription was wrong. We misread a digit from a gravestone and walked half a mile looking for a non-existent cache. We tried a simple correction, without re-visiting the graveyard, but this yielded nothing, so in the end we walked back the graveyard and discovered the true correction to our error. Grr!

The cache is definitely NOT here!


The remaining multi cache (the Village Hall) was a six stage multi. We were able to see from the geocache waypoint map, where many of the stages were, and this enabled us to combine the stages with two other caches. We did cheat a bit with the six stage multi, as we never looked for stage 1 (!). It required extracting two dates, but because the cache owner had provided a handy checksum we could make an educated guess for the final hiding place. We were right!

St Anne’s Village Hall, Bagshot

So a brain-achy morning in Bagshot – lots of calculations, lots of ‘where would we hide a cache’, and all complete before Storm Erik blew through!

Three of the caches we found were :

February 6 : Ottershaw, part 2: tigers, otters, and dogs

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here.

We’d been to see the Lego animals at Wisley, and very good they were too.



Afterwards, on our way home, we stopped at Ottershaw to finish off the cache series that we had started in mid-January, planning to find the caches in the northern half of the series, around Ether Hill and Queenswood. Our first cache was close to the car park; we found it very quickly, though it won’t be that simple come the spring, when the vegetation starts to grow, and afterwards sat unobtrusively on a nearby seat to sign the log and watch the many, many dogs enjoying the open space, some fast some slow, all waggy (and that’s just the dogs!), who were accompanied, of course, by their owners.

There were just as many dogs in the woods. We had to resort to the ‘make a fictitious phone call’ trick so that we didn’t look suspicious while a dog-walking muggle and friends moved out of sight. My, these woods are dog heaven! It was worth waiting, as we then found a trackable lurking in a large cache. We carried on through the trees, choosing a random route, and finding an ammo can (even bigger!), then a small cache at the edge of a golf course. Everywhere, everywhere, were dogs and dog walkers; just how many dogs live around here? A final cache lay just over the A319 in Ottershaw Chase. For a moment, there were no dogs, and no muggles, and we had a chance to search uninterrupted. It paid off, as we found another cache and another trackable.

An, on the way back, we passed a lady excercising SEVEN dogs …

Five caches and two trackables was a successful haul for a short caching trip. And so, so many happy dogs …

February 3 : Shanklin Chine, Isle of Wight

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here.

We were in Shanklin to play in a Scrabble tournament (20 games over 3 days). The tournament had finished, but our losses had continued to outnumber our wins, and neither of us won any prizes. After the prizegiving, we left the hotel just after sunset, as the light began to fade, heading for – we hoped – the final location of the Smuggler’s Path multicache, based around Shanklin Chine https://www.shanklinchine.co.uk We’d had a look along the beach at lunchtime, and had decided that the tide would be OK to make an attempt on the cache.

Passing the end of the esplanade, and the beach huts, we continued along the beach, hopping over the groynes and skirting large puddles of seawater. It was still dusk but it became much, much darker once we left the beach to scramble into woodland to our destination, an ammo box chained to a tree. We needed to undo a combination padlock to get into the box/cache. And we couldn’t manage it. We put in what we thought was the correct combination (we checked later, yes, it was OK) but we could barely see the numbers on the lock in the gloom, and we couldn’t wrestle the lock open. After a few minutes we gave up and came out onto the beach again.

It was much, much darker now, and the light had faded by the time we returned to the entrance to Shanklin Chine and climbed up to the top of the cliffs, overlooking the beach. There’s a good path along here, and we walked along the clifftop, passing the cliff lift, which is shut in February, and shut anyway at night. There’s another cache along here, and we attempted it in almost total darkness, stopping as muggles loomed out of the night, and getting well scratched by brambles, and before Mr Hg127 finally grabbed the object we were looking for.

Night caching ...

Night caching …


We returned to our hotel, down the steps by the cliff lift, which are ‘interesting’ at night, as they aren’t well lit all the way down, and back onto the seafront for a chance to reflect upon our efforts.

Postscript: if conditions were suitable, we intended to go back to that cache we had failed to unlock. But they weren’t. Next morning, a gale was blowing, and the tide was being pushed high up the beach.

Perhaps we won't go and get that cache this morning?

Perhaps we won’t go and get that cache this morning?


The cache has been added to our ‘caches with a good idea of the solution’ list for a future attempt: perhaps when we return next year?

February 1 : Rookley, Isle of Wight

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here.

We were on the wonderful Isle of Wight, ready to spend a weekend playing Scrabble in Shanklin. While crossing the island, Mr Hg137 had a business appointment in Rookley, in the centre of the island. He went off to do that, while I … was turfed out into the snow to find the nearby Church Micro cache.

Rookley Methodist Church, Isle of Wight

Rookley Methodist Church, Isle of Wight


Rookley Methodist Church is the starting point for this cache, overlooking the triangular green. This particular cache could be solved by finding seven numbers placed on various items around the green. There didn’t seem to be a best order to do this so I crunched around in the snow, gradually crossing off clues as I went. After a few minutes I’d got all the numbers except one – I just need to find the year that “Les” was born. Just then, Mr Hg137’s appointment had finished, and he joined me in a second snowy circuit of the green, spotting the remaining clue within five minutes. Of course, it was in a place I’d already looked, though clearly not hard enough; in my defence, lots of people have trouble with this specific clue.

We then worked out the coordinates … got them wrong … did them again … and set off for the location of the cache. Arriving at GZ (Ground Zero) we stared hopelessly at the object for a while, then read the hint, looked at the correct place on the object, and spotted the cache almost instantly, a nice dry container inside a rather damp camo bag.

Mondrian was here?

Mondrian was here?


Success! We went back to the geocar, admired the Mondrian-inspired garage door across the road, and set off for Shanklin.

Postscript: later, we checked our tally of Church Micro (CM) cache finds. We were were really pleased to find that we had reached 100 finds. That takes us from Curate to Vicar on the awards list on the Church Micro website http://www.15ddv.me.uk/geo/cm Another small step towards sainthood for us!

January 18 : Ottershaw

Ottershaw is a village on the outskirts of Chertsey and Woking, just minutes away from the M25.
More importantly, from our perspective, Ottershaw is on our route home from RHS Wisley.

So, on a cold-ish Friday morning we set off for a quick visit to Wisley (we were hoping to see the big Lego exhibition – but we were a week early – doh!) and then find a few caches on the return journey.

Wisley provided us with some winter colour with snowdrops and colourful Alpines in the warm greenhouses. So, with no Lego to see, we headed off to find some caches.

We had loaded 12 caches, 8 of which were part of a series called “Eli’s Walk”.

Our first three caches, though, were not part of this series. Instead we started with a very simple church micro (no graves to find, no numbers to calculate, no waypoints to enter into the GPS). This was number 60 in the Church Micro Series – the cache was placed in March 2008. The Church itself, Christ Church, was built in the mid-19th Century and became the Parish Church for the (then) scattered villages between Woking and Chertsey. It was designed in the studio of Gilbert Scott – and his Gothic Revival style is clear to see on the Church.

Christ Church, Ottershaw

Our next two caches could be described as “Cheesy”. One was called “Say Cheese” and the other “Ottershaw Supreme”. Both were hidden just off tracks in woodland. This is a photo of one of the caches…but we recommend finding the other..just for the fun of retrieving the log!

“Who ordered the pizza?”

And so onto Eli’s Walk. We crossed the busy A320 and started the series at cache 3.

We reached a crossroads on an unmade road, the GPS pointed in one direction towards a 5-barred gate. Blocking the route was a van. We asked the driver whether there was a footpath beyond the gate, and he informed us that it was ‘just houses’. We needed another path!

We walked on slightly concerned that the GPS was still pointing away from our route and our map didn’t indicate another path. A lady dog-walker approached. We enquired how we could get to ‘Ottershaw Park’. This was the name of the track that the cache was on.

‘Ottershaw Park ?
No, you can’t go there.
That’s a private estate.
The back entrance is down there but you’re not allowed in’

We were now mightily confused.

We walked on further and looked back. Both the van driver and dog walker had disappeared. We decided to investigate the track that no-one wanted us to walk along.

Ottershaw Chase


As we did so, we saw a swing gate and noticeboard side onto the path. This reassured us, as, to our limited knowledge, not many private estates have such features. In fact there were no houses to see! The noticeboard stated we were in ‘Ottershaw Chase’ not ‘Ottershaw Park’ which was the name shown on the geocaching map.

We were in woodland! And the cache was only 300 feet away!

Our GPS wobbled. A lot. We searched 3 trees before laying claim to our fourth find of the day, a small Tupperware container.

We walked on, accompanied by the sound of woodpeckers thrumming bark, and magpies swooping in and out of branches. An occasional squirrel scampered up a tree as we approached.

As we arrived at our next cache (number 5 in the series) we finally understood the dog-walker’s words. There WAS a private estate of houses, and we couldn’t enter. Nearby though was a cache hidden under a log pile. The GPS was out about 40 feet here, and we walked past the log-pile before widening our search area.

We paused for lunch. It had been a long morning. And a nearby, super-large, stile was just big enough for both of us to sit on without encroaching upon the private housing estate of Ottershaw Park.

We decided at lunch to use this stile as our furthest point of the day. We would have two more caches to find as we returned to the car, and it would leave 5 Ottershaw caches to find when we next visited Wisley.

Our penultimate cache was ‘magnetic’. For some reason we conjectured about the type of magnetic container before we arrived, and of course guessed wrong. Our search was hindered by a Southern Water Van parked nearby with its driver watching us as he chomped on his lunchtime sandwiches. We searched gates, fences, several padlocks, a nearby Southern Water building, more gates, drain covers… all to no avail. Then on our third search of a particular area we found the cache. Very well camouflaged, yet hidden in plain sight.

“Base of tree” – sigh.


Our final cache, like many others, seemed to be a little-bit-out GPS-wise. The hint ‘base of tree’ didn’t help much as we were on the edge of woodland with trees surrounding us. As we searched a number of light aircraft were landing and taking off from the nearby Brooklands Airfield, causing us to look up periodically rather than looking down for caches. After our tenth failed tree search, we saw the host, and the cache neatly hidden.

So, after a slightly false visit to Wisley we found 7 caches out of 7 and left ourselves some more caches to find on another visit!

Here are a couple of the caches we found :