August 19 : Farley Forage

Our plans today were the Farley Forage series and a couple of other caches on route. The caches were ‘squeezed’ between two other series we had completed recently – the Hampshire Drive By, and the Cache-as-Cache-can series in Farley Hill.

Passports at the ready!

The Farley Forage series was wholly in Berkshire, but due to quirkiness of the roads – and a troublesome (vehicle) ford crossing of the River Blackwater, we parked in Hampshire. Indeed this closeness of the county boundary was celebrated by our first cache of the day called County (Re) Boundary. This cache was a replacement for a previous one, and we suspect hidden in the same place. In a tree bole, 6 feet above a muddy bank.
Mr Hg137 scrambled up, located the cache and passed it down for Mrs Hg137 to sign the log and retrieve 2 trackables : Monkey Magic and a World Geocoin. What a good start to the day!

Farley Ford, standing in Berkshire, looking into Hampshire

We then started on the Farley Forage route, crossing the River Blackwater not by the ford but via a small concrete bridge and arriving very quickly at Farley Forage #1. We had read that the previous finder had reported the cache container was broken so we had taken along a film canister to provide a further layer of protection. It wasn’t needed as the cache owner had been out and fixed the cache before 9 o’clock!

The cache owner, Twinkandco, places small caches, generally nano sized, sometimes a film container, but nearly always connected to a piece of rural camouflage. Sometimes the container is inside some bark, or a log, sometimes with a ‘tail’ inside a tube.. but always great fun!

All of the caches are easy (ish) to find, but sometimes a bit of bank scrambling is needed for retrieval.

This series had been advertised as ” … very wet and boggy in places after rainy weather and WELLYS ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED“. We had worn walking boots, and we were grateful we had, as shortly after cache 4 came the mud. Two hundred yards of it. The path was one giant mudslide. We picked our way between the soft, squelchy mud, the really slippery mud and the much-easier-to-walk-on shaly mud. In fact while we were traversing the mud we almost forget to see how close the next cache was, and nearly walked by it.

Mud, mud..glorious mud!

The Farley Forage series consisted of 16 caches and we had two others to find on our 4 mile walk. The County (Re) Boundary was one, and we were soon at the other, Sandpit Lane. We had several host trees to search here, and it was only after a few minutes that we managed to find the cache.

The Farley Forage series contained one multi, and due to some over-zealous navigation on Mr Hg137’s part we approached the first part from the wrong direction thus meaning we had to retrace our steps for the final find.

We had walked uphill, away from the river and the paths were much, much drier.

Except at cache 7.

We had rounded a blind corner on the footpath, and discovered the cache was hidden behind a tree the other side of a large stretch of mud.

(We knew the cache was there, as a plethora of muddy bootprints pointed towards the tree!).

Mrs Hg137 ventured across, and retrieved the cache at the second attempt. It was just as the log was being signed when 2 people came round the blind corner.

We’d been rumbled!

But no! They were cachers too. Penwood Plodders – another husband and wife team. We made sure they endured the mud by asking them to replace the cache! We walked on with them for a cache or two, chatting about the Devon Mega, the mud and caching in general. It became apparent that their walking pace, and cache administration, was quicker then us, so we allowed them to speed ahead. Nice meeting you!

(Ed: in case you are wondering why it takes longer to write ‘hg137’ on a log rather than ‘Penwood Plodders’, its because we scribble down a brief note about each cache, our experience at it, as well as taking a photo for this blog).

That’s better… a bit drier here !

The next section of the route was relatively uneventful, the cache containers maintained their uniqueness. As we re-approached the River Blackwater we crossed a few stiles (always good hiding places) and well as a cache hidden deep in a nettle bush.

Somewhere.. near to this stile’s signage .. may be a cache!

Several times we thought we were catching up with Penwood Plodders, but every time they were returning to the footpath having left it to find a cache.

Penwood Plodders in the distance

For much of the day we could hear the sound of farm machinery, and as discovered caches 12-14 we were walking alongside the farmer’s field. What he thought of two pairs of ‘ramblers’ walking along the footpath and both pairs stopping mid-field, in the same spot, we shall never know.

I wonder whether he spotted us…

We were expecting more mud on this section as the river was only feet away, but the paths were dry and meant the mud layer on our boots was quickly being walked off.

We found all the caches on route – a very enjoyable 4 mile walk – full of interesting finds and varied countryside. If you are in the areas of Farley Hill.. we recommend the series to you!

Other Caches we found included :


April 22: Fifield


April 22/23 has a lot of meaning to us, and we like to undertake some sort of celebration.

Where will today take us?

Our celebration this year … was to go geocaching ! We decided though, not to continue caching on our Sandhurst to Sandhurst trail, but to stay local(-ish) and find some caches set by our favourite Cache Owner, JJEF.

We have often remarked on this blog about the inventiveness of JJEF caches, sometimes a work of art, other times a fiendish puzzle – nearly always made of wood. This would be a great way to celebrate!

We travelled to the small village of Fifield just south of the M4 near Maidenhead. We parked up and headed to our first cache location. This was to be the sole non-JJEF cache of the day…and we made a meal of it! Originally ‘Once a Fine Pair’ had been part of the ‘Fine Pair’ series where both a red telephone box and red letter box are adjacent to each other. Sadly, the telephone box has been removed, but the cache lives on with a slight renaming. Anyway, it was a multi-cache, so we scribbled down some numbers and performed some arithmetic a child of five would be proud of. We strode purposefully towards GZ. We went by a item that matched the hint, but since we were still 200 feet away, we didn’t stop. Sadly that was as close as we got, as we had no means of getting closer than 150 feet, as private property blocked our path. Mmm. Perhaps there is another way to GZ.

We left pondering this (passing the hint item again), tried various side roads looking for non-existent tiny alleyways that would get us to the cache. All to no avail.

Disheartened we embarked on the JJEF series.

6 caches and as JJEF wrote in the description : This series contains all manner of cache types, if you know my MO then you will manage with these hides which are meant to be fun but achievable by everyone.

The first cache hadn’t been found for a while so we were expecting a second DNF of the day. We had about half a mile to walk to start the series; as we walked we watched groundsmen manicuring two polo pitches, riders giving light exercise to their (polo) horses. Red Kites performed balletic movements above us. There was no-one else on the footpath.

Anyone for polo ?

Anyone for polo ?

Until we approached the first cache.

Where had that young couple and two dogs appeared from? Why did they spend several minutes on the footbridge we wanted to stop at ? Why did they furtively look behind as we stopped at the footbridge too ?

Yep, they were geocachers. We chatted to Team VP. They had not found the cache. Our hearts sank, as this meant we were unlikely to either.

Team VP (and doggy helpers)

Team VP (and doggy helpers)

We said we would give the location a good look, and maybe see them later. (JJEF caches really do need to be savoured, and this gave them a 10 minute head start for all future caches, meaning both of us could enjoy JJEF’s inventiveness)

We explored the footbridge in fine detail. Every screw, every plank, and every little ledge. There was however one part of the bridge that was harder to access and (here’s the big hint), let’s just say we were glad it hadn’t rained much! We found the cache…or rather we found a 4 foot long tube. The cache was inside, and to release it we had to solve a mini-maze. JJEF had constructed a mini-maze which had to be solved by means of twisting and turning the outer tube which surrounded a central pole. As we twisted and turned the outer casing more and more of the maze (and its dead ends) were visible. Until, eventually a film canister was revealed containing the log. We’d found the cache… and got to the log! Yay!

Undoing the Mini-Maze

Undoing the Mini-Maze

Of course such a contraption has to be put back together again, fortunately this was easier as the maze was visible prior to being twisted back into its tube.

We didn’t see Team VP at cache 2 of the Fifield series. This required a pencil to spring open a bird-box. Unfortunately the spring didn’t work, so we set about dismantling the bird-box with a Swiss Army knife. Another log signed.

Birdbox 1

Birdbox 1

We did see Team VP at cache 3. They hadn’t found it. They left us to search GZ. Three or four fallen huge tree trunks. Lots of bramble and prickly bushes. We scoured the area, but failed to find the cache. Most other cache owners would have hidden a cache in one of the many trunk holes, we searched those too, even though JJEF caches tend to be ‘out in the open’.

We moved on. The next cache was the easiest find of the day, in a sawn off log.

Easy -  as falling off a log!

Easy – as falling off a log!

We caught up again with Team VP at cache 5. We had to find a padlocked box, and nearby a number to unlock it. Before we tried to search Team VP realised that they had hidden the ‘number’ in an incorrect way. They told us this and what the correction should be. All very well, but this assumed we would find the box and the nearby number. Fortunately we did!

Here's the where's the code number ?

Here’s the where’s the code number ?

The last cache in the series was another bird box, and again opened in a way only a JJEF cache can!

Birdbox 2

Birdbox 2

So we walked back to the car, and then remembered the multi-cache from earlier. We re-checked our calculation! Whoops! So much for a simple sum a five year old could do.. we failed miserably! The corrected sum took us back to where we had been before…and who was ahead of us … Team VP ! We both signed the logs, and parted. Farewell Team VP .. happy caching in the future.

Stumped by our arithmetic!

Stumped by our arithmetic!

Arguably that was the last cache, but we knew of one more JJEF cache a short drive (sort of) on the way home. As we drove, we tried to remember the last time we had seen geocachers ‘on the cache’ (excluding meets) and decided it was October 2015. We wondered whether it would be another 18 months before we saw another cacher.

The cache we were driving to was called ‘Mini Elevator’ set on the junction of a footpath and a small one-car layby. As we approached the layby we saw a car already parked in it. Plan B. Park in the nearby cricket club. How can we bluff our way past the over-officious groundsman to park our car ? Since we had travelled in Mrs HG137’s car, that would be her problem. Meanwhile…back at the layby, what are those two ladies doing ? Are they looking for something?

Yes, they were.

They were looking for the cache we had come to seek. Foxscout and Doggwalker had come all the way from Essex to cache for the day, and attend a cacher’s meet in Windsor the day after. They had 30 or 40 caches ahead of them for the day, and we joined them in the search. Doggywalker found JJEF’s (non-wooden) construction and we both signed the log.

Having gone 18 months between seeing geocachers out and about, we had barely gone 18 minutes! Amazing!

So a really fun morning, we met 4 geocachers (and two dogs), found 6 JJEF caches, and got sent to the bottom of the class for some really poor arithmetic!

Bluebells to finish!

Bluebells to finish!

January 30 : Crocked in Camberley

One of the advantages of blogging about geocaching, is that our blogs are read, in the main, by geocachers and we in turn read their blogs.

Would this Swan help us to find a cache ?

Would this Swan help us to find a cache ?

We follow with interest the adventures of Robbinn (and CockRobin) whose blog you can link to at the side of this panel. Although we’ve never met them, we know that they live locally to us and when they blogged about a great new mini-series in Camberley – we knew we’d like it too!

The series CDW (Camberley Dog Walk) consists of 5 caches in a residential part of Camberley just north of the M3. We were expecting the M3’s noise to spoil the walk, but in fact it was barely audible at all.

We parked, as most people do, at CDW#1. The cache was hidden at a road junction, and the obvious hiding place was quickly scanned for the cache. We were expecting a small nano from the description warning “take tweezers” and thus is was a shock to eventually something much larger!

First cache of the day!

First cache of the day!

We walked on to CDW#2 passing some expensive looking houses arriving at a salt/sand bin, which given the warm winter is rather a superfluous piece of street furniture. The cache hint mentioned ‘sticky sand’, so we went looking for a stick near the sand bin. Lots of sticks lay in the nearby hedgerow. We picked each of them up, looked all over, trying to find the cache. Sadly we didn’t! The bin was close to several houses, and after 15 minutes searching we thought it best to move on, before suspicions were aroused. Clearly we missed the cache, but we’re sure on another day we’ll find it within seconds.

We then had a longish walk to CDW#3. The properties we passed were slightly less salubrious, but the wood and lake (Watchetts Pond) we arrived at were well worth the walk.

Surrounding the lake was a footpath and quite mature trees. There were two caches lakeside, one either side of the lake. The first CDW#3 was in a clearing. There was a fallen log/trunk, several trees with hidey-holes, several trees with no holes at all. There were also two concrete cubes which provided useful seating. (Most people we think sit on these cubes and feed the swans, which incidentally didn’t help us… I guess because we had nothing to feed them with!). We searched the trees, we searched the logs, we searched the cubes. Again to no avail. The clearing was not overlooked by houses, so we could search to our hearts-content.. poking here, prodding there, peeling bark here, lifting leaves there… where was this cache ? Eventually, and reluctantly, we gave up.

Watchetts Pond

Watchetts Pond

CDW#4 was a delight for several reasons – firstly we found it! Secondly the container was special. If you read RobbInn’s blog, and our title, and the cache hint, you know what to look for… but the moment the cache is found makes it very special. We, like RobbInn are not going to post a picture…you’ll have to wait for our end-of year caches for that!

We returned to CDW#3 and another look in the clearing. Had we missed anything ? After another 5 minutes fruitless searching we abandoned and headed for CDW#5.

CDW#5 should have been easy. It was in an alleyway in a bush. Quite straightforward. However, the bush was adjacent to a house and garden… and the lady of the house was gardening (in January ! Really! ) right next to GZ. No point searching – we moved on.

Last cache of the day!

Last cache of the day!

Our journey back to the car took us past the Camberley Cricket Club where another cache awaited us. Fortunately a quick find to raise our flagging spirits at the end of a disappointing morning’s caching trip. (3 of 6 caches found)

The only advantage, if there is one, to so many DNFs, is that we have a small cluster to come and re-attempt on another occasion.

That’s 2 poor caching trips in a row.. are we losing our caching skills or will February bring better luck. Lets hope so.

October 10 : Richmond to Barnes Bridge

Some days are good days, some days are …

The journey started well enough as we caught the train to Richmond – Mr Hg137 even got chatting to someone he recognised on the train (but only remembered her name as we left (tsk, tsk)).
We passed through a deserted Twickenham station and knowing that the Rugby World Cup was on, remarked “It’ll be a lot busier this afternoon”. A short walk through Richmond town centre, in that early morning when shopkeepers haven’t quite got set up, but customers are buying to avoid the queues later.

The river on arrival was quiet. The summer was definitely over, hire boats were out of the water, being sanded, varnished and re-waterproofed. We wandered along the path, dodging the usual array of keep-fit enthusiasts to arrive at Richmond Lock.

End of Season maintenance

End of Season maintenance

To many people this lock is a surprise, as the river is tidal at this point and why would a lock be necessary? Apparently, about 100 years ago, the boat owners complained that the ebbing tide also took more river water out with it, leaving a very shallow body of water. A lock and weir was built to trap river water at low tide. For two hours either side of high tide, boats can ‘ride the weir’ in safety, but for the remaining time boats must use the lock (and, unusually, pay for the privilege!).
Richmond Lock - tide's out .. please pay!

Richmond Lock – tide’s out .. please pay!

Our first cache was on the bridge over the weir. The description mentioned both a key-safe (a slim magnetic playing card type cache) or a magnetic nano. Lots of metal, lot of of muggle dodging, lots of looking. Not a cache to be found. Not a good start!
Low tide

Low tide

We did notice that the tide must have been at low when we were at the lock as various sandbanks were visible in the river. Further down the path the tide was coming in quite quickly as many a rowing crew were being whisked upstream with barely an oar in the water.

We paused close to our next target ( Oh Deer! ).

A terrain 4.5 cache.

A tree climb.

After our success on the previous walk we had thoughts of at least looking at it. But to get to it there was a 6 foot drainage channel to cross. There was a bridge… made of uneven logs. We couldn’t even work out how to get onto the logs! We gave the cache a miss ! (And also realised some time after that neither of us took a photo of this obstacle!). Two caches sort of attempted, none found. Its going to be one of those days…

…and it didn’t improve at the next cache, Swamp Cache. Somewhere in the trees, down a bank, in a slightly muddy, overgrown area was a cache the size of a tennis ball. Was it on the half a dozen trees we examined ? Was it really in the swamp area with indeterminate depth of water just beyond ? We never found it. Three failures out of three – our caching trip was going very well indeed.

A rare success!

A rare success!

Our next two caches were remnants of an old 20-cache series set in October 2009. Now only two remain, numbers 16 and 19. Both, fortunately for us, easily found. But one was in desperate need of maintenance that it can’t be long before only one cache will remain from this series. Looking at logs for the other 18 archived caches, the owner has been negligent with cache maintenance with the whole series. Such a shame the cache owner didn’t maintain them, as the Thames Path does lend itself to lots of good hiding places !
Lots of good hiding places along here

Lots of good hiding places along here

The Thames Path passed behind Richmond Deer Park (hence the ‘oh Deer’ cache earlier, and Kew Gardens. On the other bank Syon House, was clearly visible. Syon House has been in the Percy family (Dukes of Northumberland) since 1594. Although it is still in private hands, it is open for visiting 3 days a week during the Summer.
Syon House

Syon House

One other great moment of interest (well to Mrs Hg137, a canal buff) was where an arm of the Grand Union of Canal meets with the Thames. From here one can travel all the way to Birmingham by boat!

Grand Union Canal

Grand Union Canal

The South Bank of the Thames was devoid of caches for some distance (presumably the 20 cache series had caches on this stretch), so we crossed to the Northern Bank. We had two objectives – firstly to see and photograph the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race Finishing Post. Second to find the cache yards from it!

We failed with both!

The Boat Race Finishing Post SHOULD be here!

The Boat Race Finishing Post SHOULD be here!

Firstly the finishing post had been removed and replaced by a temporary banner for that weekend’s (non-University) racing. Secondly we didn’t find the cache.. but we did find another cacher signing its log!

When we arrived at Ground Zero, the few people that were around were all connected with rowing. They were engaged with packing up, cleaning boats and the like. Except one lady, sitting on a stump, crouched over a piece of paper.

We enquired whether she was a geocacher and whether she was holding a geocache! We were right! A lovely Spanish lady with caching name of doways. Welcome to the UK – and hope you enjoy your caching adventures here!

Doways with the cache

Doways with the cache

So really we didn’t find that cache either!

We completed our walk on the North bank crossing back to the South bank to catch a bus back to Richmond. The bus was late (we think due to Rugby traffic on its outbound route), and we just missed a train home. This gave us plenty of time on Richmond Station to watch hundreds of Welsh and Australian rugby fans descend on the platform, squeeze on the next train, and depart.

Arrive, squeeze, depart.

Arrive, squeeze, depart.

Suddenly the whole station reverberated with the singing of “Cwm Rhondda” – a huge sound got closer and closer. then just six Welshman arrived and they were responsible for the huge sound ! Amazing!

Our train arrived, and like all the others was jam-packed, so much so we could barely get on it! Get on it we did but we were so squashed on the 10 minute journey to Twickenham station we could barely breathe.

An unpleasant end, to a rather poor day’s outing! Still there’s always next time!

Thames Path statistics :
Route length : 5.3 miles
Total distance walked : 161.75 miles

Caches found : 3 (or was it 2.5?)
Total caches found : 289

December 23 – Another First-To-Find Attempt .. this time in Fleet!

I never learn!

Our last geocaching sortie resulted in a failed ‘first-to-find’. Today there was an opportunity to redeem ourselves (well myself as Mrs Hg137 was working and I went solo).

A couple of new caches had been published in Fleet, and overnight one called “MIND YOUR HEAD” had still not been found. It was, a little unusually, an offset multi where the published co-ordinates took you to one site, once there, a further set of numbers to take you to the real cache site.

The Bridge

The Bridge

The first part took me to a bridge. A quick peer underneath this very muddy bridge yielded nothing. No obvious ‘mini-cache’ with some numbers on. After much pondering I decided to give up, and just as I returned to my car, two other cachers came along. They had tried yesterday and failed to get past the first part. They explained that under the bridge was a sign saying “MIND YOUR HEAD” (in fairness I’d seen this, but hadn’t seen the tiny numbers on it). They had established these were not the final co-ordinates.

The three of us looked harder at the sign. This involved crouching, for me at any rate quarter height, in a wet muddy stream and occasionally (euphemism for “often”) losing balance and landing in the brown goo.

After much searching, and me getting wetter and wetter I gave up. At the point I did, one of the other cachers had found what turned out to be a crucial element (sorry spoilers). He went on to collect the final cache – well done The MadCacher007 for the First-to-Find and thanks for the tip-off on how to solve it next time. (When I say “next time”… it may be Mrs Hg137 I send into the muddy mire!).

December 6th – Bamboozled in Basingstoke


Various titles have been given to Basingstoke in the past…
“Doughnut City” (Ed : roundabout, after roundabout, after roundabout)
“The jewel of North Hampshire” (Ed : not sure if this a beautiful sapphire or a rough diamond)
“The lost city of Basingstoke” (Ed: drive South down the M3 to understand this)

Add to it now..
“The place where cachers fail” !

A simple urban series (Bobs Bimble), 9 caches + one other… on streets, footpaths, around a couple of residential estates in Basingstoke. No mud, no rivers, a dry walk with 10 straightforward caches.

Oh dear! Oh dear ! Oh dear!

This newish series was so new there was still a FTF available (despite at least 3 cachers being ahead of us). We parked near this cache and had a quick look at its GZ first. Nothing. Not too disappointing as we’d read the Cache Owner was going to inspect it and maybe something might well have changed when we return later.

Somewhere around this frosty park are 3 geocaches.. can you see them?

Somewhere around this frosty park are 3 geocaches.. can you see them?

Onto cache 2.. near a recycling point. Obvious place to hide a cache, and we were fairly certain we looked there… clearly not..2 caches searched – 2 DNFs.

Onto cache 3.. somewhere between a tree and a bush. Next to someone’s garden, where there was work going on. We looked quickly, but then were interrupted by dog-walker after dog-walker after dog-walker. We searched a bit more before the dogs made it clear they wanted ‘home’ and so they returned past us. We gave up. 3 searches… 3 DNFs.

Onto cache 4 …hidden very close to a back garden. Not visible, and we didn’t feel like checking really, really, thoroughly. Aargh ! 4 DNFs in a row.

Give up ? go on ? We went on !

We found a cache! Yay! Marked as a trackable hotel, but with no trackables in it. We have never been so grateful to see an ivy log!
Our success continued with our next few caches too, with the last being near a major supermarket. Here for some reason we were imagining a smallish magnetic nano, but very surprisingly found a largish container. A real highlight today!

We rejoined the Bobs Bimble trail, and our luck deserted us (or was it our poor caching skills?) when we failed to find another on a close-boarded fence. That’s 5 DNFs out of 9, with only one more cache to go…

…”behind a tree near a bush” – wonderful hint, but when there 3 trees, and loads of bushes and your luck isn’t in.. its an enormous task. We looked long, and hard, and looked again.

“Have you found it ?”

A pair of passers-by approached. “Have you found it?” they repeated.

They were cachers too (8p4l and fishying … and Rufus the dog) and joined us in the search. A few more moments and the cache was in hand and jointly signed. We exchanged notes on our morning’s work.. they had been more successful than us and shared some of the hiding places (thanks!).

We headed back to where we started… the potential FTF. We now had 4 pairs of eyes, and a geohound… but again the cache eluded us.

However armed with the information about one of our previous failures, we headed off to acquire our 6th find of the day.

So we finished with 6 out of 10 caches, bamboozled in Basingstoke.

Editors footnote :
Since our escapade, we have noted 2 of our DNFs have either been moved or re-calibrated. This work was being undertaken WHILE we on the route, so it was no wonder we couldn’t find them! We feel a bit better now!

Here are 2 of the caches we did find…

18 May 2014 – Tunworth – 2 series instead of 1 !

Last Autumn, readers may remember, we undertook the “Westeros” series of caches in Hampshire. Today our caching trip took us to two newish series adjacent to that previous series.

The first, to the North of the Westeros series, was a ‘tribute’ series where every cache was named after a group of caching friends who meet every Wednesday. With such diverse names as Omiwahn, 8p4l and Misty’s Muskateers we wondered what they looked like in real life! He had met at least one of the cachers before, Tadley Trailblazer, coincidentally when we did the Westeros series originally.

There was no obvious start of finish point of the trail, so we squeezed our geo-car into one of the few places we could and off we set. Initially through farm fields, our route slowly climbed to ‘Five Ways’ a major crossing point of local footpaths. Indeed the first part of the trail we had walked 4 years previously when we undertook the ‘3 Castles Path’ from Windsor to Winchester. Five Ways is at the top of a hill, and then it was downhill all the way passing more farms, and then a final quarter of a mile or so of road walking!

Great countryside, and lots crops growing in the fields – we saw barley, wheat, potatoes, oil-seed rape and lots more besides.

Oilseed Rape forming its seeds

Oilseed Rape forming its seeds

The caches themselves were fairly straightforward – simple magnets on metal posts, camouflaged film containers, etc but two caches stood out – one inside some discarded ‘street furniture’ and another inside a child’s toy. (Sorry no spoilers… just wait until the end of year blog!)

Example cache 1

Example cache 1

Example cache 2

Example cache 2

Example Cache 3

Example cache 3

As we arrived back at the car we saw two men approaching both armed with a GPS.

They were geo-cachers too.. and they were two of the cachers named in the series and they were out to find their namesakes.

Great meeting you Sufferin Succocache and Hough Hunterz!

A brief check of the map, and we moved the car about 3 miles south to attempt the GOT series. (The Westeros series is named after people/places in the “Games of Thrones” TV Series; the GOT (Game of Thrones) series is as well.)

Before we set off, a quick Church micro. As usual we had to collect clues to ascertain the co-ordinates of the cache. Normally these clues are on gravestones, but this church, All Saints Tunworth, had an ornamental porch and we counting roses, thistles and shamrocks in its beautiful engraving.

All Saints, Tunworth

All Saints, Tunworth

Then onto the GOT series, a short trail of about 2.5 miles, and 9 caches.

With caches with such diverse names as GOT Cersei, GOT Bronn, and GOT Jorah we wondered – not for the first time today – who these people were!

A fairly straightforward set of caches, with two exceptions. The first, about halfway round was hinted as being ‘in the hole of a tree’. A magnificent holey tree stood at GZ, lots of branches, roots, holes aplenty. Was the cache there ? No of course not! A much smaller, nondescript tree nearby had a tiny hole in its bark…

Surely a cache location ?

Surely a cache location ?

Somewhere under here though ...

Somewhere under here though …

Under this log ?!

Under this log ?!

The second exception was the last cache of the day – cache 23. It was in a bus shelter. We hadn’t DNFed any cache that day and were feeling smug. 15 minutes later our smugness had disappeared when we could not find this final cache. We paused for a drink, sat and pondered for another 5 minutes and eventually found the elusive rascal! Phew!

23 caches – 2 great series – and great views all day.

Cache locations of the future ?

Cache locations of the future ?