April 7 : Sandhurst (Gloucs) to Sandhurst : Down Hatherley to Shurdington

Hello, Mrs Hg137 here again.

The morning’s rain had passed, so in the drier afternoon we walked the second section of our epic walk from Sandhurst (Gloucestershire) home to Sandhurst (Berkshire). This section followed the Gloucestershire Way, starting from Down Hatherley Church, along the edge of a golf course, round the perimeter of Gloucester aka Staverton airport, then, in quick succession, across the A40, the Gloucester-Cheltenham railway, and the M5, before following a stream through Badgeworth and finally to Shurdington at the foot of the Cotswold scarp. Quite a varied walk!


It was some way to our first cache of the day, so we started with a pleasant walk through the silver birches fringing the golf course, watching the golfers hitting their shots with various amounts of competence. (We didn’t comment, not even on the worst efforts – honest!)

Gloucester Airport

Gloucester Airport


... and then the mud started!

… and then the mud started!


After crossing a road – no caches yet – our route led us on a fenced-in path that skirted the very edge of Gloucester Airport. And here the sticky, squelchy, slippy mud started … It sounds grim, but the airport was hidden behind a hedged bank, a skylark sang overhead, and we were walking/slithering along the reed-fringed Hatherley Brook. A while later, we emerged at an underpass which took us under the A40, and across cycle route 41. We had arrived at our first cache – Collie Capers – a series named after a favourite dog-walking route. And suddenly there were dogs (no collies though), cyclists, runners, walkers … We picked our moment, retrieved the cache, and had a coffee as they all streamed by.
Rickety railway bridge

Rickety railway bridge


On we went, following the stream. Our next target, and our next cache, was close to the main line railway from Cheltenham to Gloucester. It was called ‘The Rickety Railway Bridge’ and, oh crikey, did it live up to its name. It all looks solidly supported but I’m a bit worried that a mainline railway should be propped up like this?
Aah ... cute!

Aah … cute!


The one field between the railway line and the M5 is populated with geese and goats of all ages. The oh-so-cute goat kids (goatlets?) were totally underwhelmed by Mr Hg137 attempts to make friends.

Crossing the M5, we were immediately at our next cache. It was only as we approached we registered the Difficulty/Terrain rating (difficult, very difficult) and thought we may not attempt the cache. However, a careful up-and-over the mound of what looks like fly-tipped building rubble, and we were at GZ. Not so hard, really.

Our next few caches followed the line of a stream, along a more-or-less soggy path. They were all from the ‘Cheltenham Circular Caching Challenge’ series, which is described like this:
‘A series of in excess of 100 caches of a variety of terrains and difficulties set around the Cheltenham Circular Footpath by some of Cheltenham’s cachers

Devised by Cheltenham Borough Council, the Cheltenham Circular Walk follows a route of approx 26 miles and gives wonderful views of the Cotswolds escarpment. The walk starts and ends at Pittville Park and passes Cheltenham Racecourse and Dowdeswell Reservoir.

The Cheltenham Circular Caching Challenge of more than 100 caches follows this walk. It starts at Cheltenham Race Course with #1, and the caches are numbered clockwise. But you could of course start and stop anywhere along the route.’

Of the several caches we found from this series, one stands out: ‘No more Bull’ (the clue is in the title). We had walked through a muddy field, with cows. They seemed disinterested at first, but started to wander towards us as we walked. We speeded up, as far as is possible in ankle-deep mud. At the far end of the field was a kissing gate, and a cache. We narrowly beat the cows to the gate and slipped through to safety just in time. The cache was then retrieved under the close inspection of many big brown bovine eyes.

Just two caches remained, one, a large cache across a little stream – a bit of stream jumping was needed here, and the geo-pole came in very useful – and the other, the Church Micro in Badgeworth. We looked inside the church and had a quick refreshment stop before finding the clues. Had we realised one of the clues was right in front of us, we’d have saved ourselves some time! We argued about this clue, which asked what year in life someone was at the date of death – since if one is in one’s XXth year, one has yet to reach XX in age. (E.g. a one year old is in their second year of life). Anyway, we calculated 2 sets of coordinates, and found the cache at the first of them.

Badgeworth Church

Badgeworth Church


The description of the cache also asks for a report on something else in the churchyard – the toilets… They were closed. Apparently this is almost always so, judging by other logs!
Closed!

Closed!


And that was it for the day. Tired and muddy, we arrived at Shurdington, a little bit closer on our quest to walk home to Sandhurst from Sandhurst. Quite a varied walk!

Here are some of the caches we found:

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April 6 : Sandhurst (Gloucs) to Sandhurst : Sandhurst to Down Hatherley

Last year, 2017, we set ourselves a challenge to walk from where we live in Sandhurst, Berkshire to Sandhurst, Kent. There is a third Sandhurst in the UK, which is just a few miles North of Gloucester.

This year’s challenge is to walk, (and cache of course) from Sandhurst, Gloucestershire to our home in Berkshire.
The distance is likely to be about 90 miles. As last year, we will try to walk a relatively direct route, but again like last year we do have to avoid certain obstacles such as Army Land, Airports, Rivers etc..

We are starting our challenge later this year as Winter’s short day-length coupled with a 2 hours drive would have meant very short trips. Then, the late Winter weather (“The Beast from the East” x 2!) scuppered our start dates in February/March.

So, some weeks later than planned, we booked a weekend away to start our walk and cache our way home.

St Lawrence, Sandhurst (Gloucs)

Sandhurst (Gloucs) is a relatively small, strung-out village just off the A38. There is one road in, and another out. Its location near to the River Severn means when the River floods, Sandhurst can be cut off.

We parked a car in the church car park and very quickly found our first cache. The GPS said ’17 feet away’ and before we could check the hint, the magnetic micro was in Mrs Hg137’s hand.

First cache of our journey home

Signed, replaced. Very easy. Fingers crossed for an easy ride for the next 90 miles!

Before we headed East, we wanted to see the River Severn. It had been on high flood alert (red alert), for the previous 4 days and we wanted to see how full it was. We never got there! After walking through a farm we arrived, just 2 fields away from the river-bank. But that first field was one large puddle! Water was gushing in from another field, our exit stile was in the middle of a lake. We abandoned our visit to the River Severn, though we both ended up with some of its water in our boots!

Should the River Severn really be this close ?


Sandhurst Church, where we found the first cache, is relatively old and dedicated to Saint Lawrence. It has been a place of worship since the 14th century, and also contains a 12th century font. The peace in the church was marred by roadworks going on within yards of our parked car!

No caches here!

The first couple of miles of our route were cacheless, even though we went over a couple of stiles and saw ‘useful’ trees which would have made good hosts.

In the distance … Gloucester Cathedral

Across flooded fields we glimpsed Gloucester Cathedral; shortly after we walked near to the Nature in Art Museum.

Nature in Art Museum/Gallery

The Museum acts a gallery for artists and artworks associated with Nature. As we crossed the Museum’s drive we made a navigational error. We were looking for a footpath, but we failed to realise until we had walked for 15 minutes, that there were two adjacent paths…and we had taken the wrong one.

This meant we had an extra half-mile road-walking to reach the tiny village of Twigworth. Here we crossed the busy A38,and headed for a bridge over the Hatherley Brook. We were expecting the Brook to have overflowed its banks too, but it hadn’t which meant we could try to find three caches close to its banks.

The first ‘Green Troll House’ was on one of the bridges. We took sometime to find this cache.

Somewhere on this bridge..


Magnetic. Hidden under feet, but not under the bridge.

Very specific. But we fingered the bridge all over. Young spring nettles defended (a bit too vigorously) a location or two and after 10 minutes we were about to give up. Then we saw the item, well concealed. A classic case of standing back and looking from a distance rather than fingertip searching.

…here it is!

The next cache was easier. Under a stile – one of those stiles, which now goes nowhere, as the footpath bypasses it. Everyone now walks by the cache without even realising it is there. (The stile did give Mrs Hg137 a chance to ‘relace her boots’ as a few people approached just as the cache was about to be replaced).

Our next cache was our only DNF of the day. Hidden by a kissing post – it was nowhere to be seen. We weren’t the only cachers to log a DNF, so we are fairly certain the cache has gone.

We continued following the Hatherley Brook, now adjacent to a Golf Course to Down Hatherley Church. We were on two long distance footpaths, The Glevum Way which circumnavigates Gloucester and the Gloucestershire Way which is a 100 mile path visiting Stow-on-the-Wold, Chepstow and Tewkesbury.

Two long distances footpaths at the same time!

Down Hatherley Church (St Mary and Corpus Christi) was the location for a fairly straightforward multi.

St Mary and Corpus Christi, Down Hatherley

Find two gravestones, extract a date or two, perform a simple calculation and find the cache. Most previous finders had mentioned that the co-ordinates were 30 feet out, so we went to the calculated co-ordinate site and split up. Mr Hg137 set off towards a distant tree, but Mrs Hg137 found the cache with the help of some nearby sheep!

We know where the cache is! Don’t ewe?

So we completed the first 4 miles of our ‘journey home’, found 4 caches as well as innumerable flooded fields. Fingers crossed it gets drier!

March 31 : Mud, Mud, Glorious Mud!

Is there anything worse than a wet Bank Holiday weekend? Easter 2018 will go down as one of those washout weekends. And yet we managed a short caching trip (almost) avoiding the rain.

Flooded Fields of Wokingham

Our targets were 8 caches in Wokingham (7 standard caches and one puzzle cache) on the footpaths in the Luckley area. The paths were close to, and at times crossed, the River Emmbrook, and its many streams and rivulets.

Our first target was the puzzle cache, relatively close to a large supermarket car park. (As we parked the car, the heavens opened so we waited patiently for clearing skies before we set off).

The puzzle cache had recently been replaced and moved, though the puzzle coordinates had remained unchanged. This was a little suspicious, but we looked anyway. After 10 minutes we gave up, as we still had the other 7 caches to find, and we wanted to find as many as we could before the next downpour.

River Emmbrook

We were familiar with the first part of our route as it followed a footpath we had walked several times previously. The path bisected some fields associated with some stables, but today the horses were all in the dry, and the company we had was a lady clearing the fields some distance away.

Our first find of the day was almost in the lady’s eye-line, but we think we found it without being spotted. We were expecting to find the cache near an oak tree, so we looked at the 10-15 year old oak close by. It was a few minutes later we saw an oak SAPLING, which provided the location for our first find of the day.

First cache of the day!

At this point the paths got muddier and muddier. We crossed the Emmbrook (on a slightly rickety bit of concrete), and walked uphill. Streams cascaded either side of the path, green fields were underwater.

A broken fence provided an easy escape from the mud. About half-way up the slope was our second find, a reasonable sized container which was big enough to hold a trackable. We had brought the Swiss Mountain Cow with us, and bade it farewell overlooking Berkshire’s green (and flooded) land.

Farewell Swiss Mountain Cow!

At the top of the hill we turned onto our final footpath of the day. Very straight, and of course from time to time, very muddy. Our last 5 caches of the day were all along this path.

Mr Hg137 straddles the mud…

… Mrs Hg137 goes for the log and tree approach

Each cache was differently hidden, sometimes under a log, other times behind some metal joints. The views looking across the Emmbrook (mini-valley) were surprisingly good given we were only a mile or two from the hustle and bustle of the supermarket car park.

We walked close to Ludgrove School, where Princes William and Harry were educated. Initially we saw the school buildings, later we saw the playing fields. We examined an odd structure in one of these fields – it turned out to be a covered coat rack! We also walked past a pheasant farm – noisy as the farmer was busy feeding the birds!

Ludgrove School

Partridge Farm

We had so far avoided any further rain, but just as we were signing the log at cache 8, the rain started again. Fortunately we were under a tree, and it gave us surprisingly good cover.

Former Lucas Hospital, Wokingham

Field of Rooks

We then had to journey back the way we came – through the muddy footpaths. We then remembered a slightly different and parallel route, which led us past the former Lucas Hospital and a field of rooks. This meant walking on a tarmac road for part of our return journey – but after the muddy quagmires we weren’t going to argue.

We gave a final check of the puzzle cache – again no joy – and left with 7 caches found out of 8 – not a bad return given the mud-fest.

Here are some of the caches we found :

Postscript :
We emailed the cache owner of the puzzle cache and told him/her of our difficulties in finding the cache. It transpired that although our co-ordinates were spot on, the cache had moved ‘some distance away’. Fortunately for us we were visiting Wokingham the next day, and we were able to find the puzzle in its new location. So 8 caches out of 8 (with a bit of cache owner assistance).

February 3 : A Cold Camberley Constitutional

Camberley Scultpure

It was one of those cold winter’s days. The sun was nowhere to be seen. There was a coldish breeze blowing, and the clouds were periodically producing light drizzle.

Not the most inspiring day to go cachimg, so we chose somewhere local to us, Camberley Town Centre. About 1.5 miles from where we live, this seemed ideal. If the weather got slightly worse, we could shelter in shops; if the weather got really bad we could retreat to the car and get home very, very quickly.

Fortunately we didn’t need either escape route as we undertook the Camberley Constitutional Cache. This multi-cache took us to 11 different locations near the centre of Camberley. We started just to the south of the Town Centre and had to acquire information about a Grade II listed building associated with Sir Edwin Lutyens. Now without meaning to disrespect Camberley, it is not one of the places one would naturally associate with Lutyens. A truly unexpected find !

Edwin Lutyens House

We headed North towards the Centre, passing under the railway (waypoint 2), and walked to the Station.
Here we paused, to collect our first cache of the day. Another multi, and one where we had to count bicycle racks, platforms and doors to calculate the co-ordinates for the final hiding place. Although the cache was slightly off our Consitutional route, it was only a couple of minutes out of our way. (We discovered Camberley has an inordinate number of green telecoms boxes.. and this hide was the first of three green boxes we were going to cache behind!)

We resumed our Camberley Constitutional walk by passing the Theatre, Council Offices and Museum (a further three waypoints here). Then our route turned in toward the Town Centre, where we had a store name to verify (here, we almost miscounted the letters on the faded sign).

Up to now our route had been quiet, a bit bustly, but then we had to walk along the A30. A major traffic route, and the noise level increased substantially. We collected another waypoint before crossing to the road to Camberley’s War Memorial.

This stands outside the main gates of the Royal Military Academy (Sandhurst). (Interestingly the rear entrance to the RMA is in Sandhurst, Berkshire yards from our house, but the main official entrance is in Camberley, Surrey !). At the War Memorial we had to find the lengths of various names, and derive a set of co-ordinates for our third multi of the day. We made a school-boy error here, as the cache owner had given a checksum for the final co-ordinates for the cache, but we calculated the check-sum on the numbers we had found. We double and indeed triple checked our numbers (to no avail) before heading off to a possible location where we did find the cache! It was only after emailing the cache owner afterwards did he point out our inability to read instructions!

Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst


We had one more waypoint on the Camberley Constitutional to find on the A30. It was at a Church where a standard cache was also hidden (and if truth be told we took a bit too long finding the cache – unearthing cold, wet leaf litter on a freezing day was not our best strategy). The Camberley Constitutional route took us past several churches – some modern, some much older. St Tarcisius Church was erected 100 years ago to commemorate those soldiers trained at the RMA who were killed during the First World War.

St Tarcisius Church


Our Constitutional cache then took us away from the A30 (passing the Sports Centre – another waypoint) and through a park. We took the wrong exit out of the park (we mis-interpreted the term ‘diagonally across’ far too literally) and ended up heading back towards the A30!

Camberley Sculpture

Whoops! We realised out mistake and soon found ourselves collecting the final waypoints on our walk. A swift calculation later and we arrived at the cache! Although the container and its hiding place were not special the tour around Camberley certainly was. Caching really is educational!

We had one more cache to collect. We had solved a puzzle cache before we left home (part of the Surrey School Days series). We correctly identified a person who had been educated in Surrey, before becoming famous in a particular film role, and is still on our TV screens today). We drove 2 miles around the residential streets of Camberley, but a shorter route – had Mr Hg137 turned the car around ! – was only 0.5 miles!

A very entertaining, if cold, afternoon in Camberley. Three multi-caches, one puzzle cache, one standard cache and two very cold cachers! And the rain kept off too!

May 26 : Sandhurst to Sandhurst (Kent) : Kent border to Sandhurst

PROLOGUE

Our last caching trip on our Sandhurst (Berks) to Sandhurst (Kent) finished yards from the Kent border, and when we drove away we had thoughts of striding purposefully into Kent and onto Sandhurst… however since our last visit we were asked to undertake a small diversion while still in Sussex.

Kent, Sussex

Kent is ahead of us..but we’re not going there, yet!


The last cache we found on our previous trip contained a sheet of paper with the ‘Northings’ for the Great Wigsell Multi. Another cache, unfortunately now archived, contained the ‘Eastings’. This meant the Great Wigsell Multi was unreachable. The cache owner of these three caches contacted us with the missing information and asked, if we had time, to visit the Multi as it contained a trackable which needed to be moved on.

And so instead of heading East into Kent, we headed further South through light woodland for a 1/3 of a mile. We were pleasantly surprised on our arrival. Not only was the cache there after an eight month gap…but it was an ammo can!

We released the trackable and headed back to our car, wondering how many other cache owners we would be helping on the this holiday (see previous blog for more details).

And so to Kent.

THE SANDHURST WALK

Before finding the Great Wigsell Multi our day had not begun well. There had been a major accident and our route to the Kent border had been blocked. A plethora of side roads were also blocked with roadworks so we had had an interesting drive to our start point.

Our route was to take us 2/3 mile along a narrow country lane, unfortunately this was being used as one of the few roads open. We edged our way along, taking care watching out for traffic.

Or at least that was the agreed plan.

Sadly Mr Hg137 decided to check maps/GPS whilst walking up the pavement-less road and failed to spot a large pot-hole.

He landed considerably worse for wear, face down, lying on the tarmac.

Grazed wrists, ripped trousers, and several layers of skin removed from a lower leg. Ouch!

He limped to a gap in the roadside, where a passing motorist provided us with a few tissues which staunched the wounded leg. We both thought that having walked so far on our Sandhurst route, we would fail with just 2.5 miles to walk!

We sat. Annoyed.

Eventually Mr Hg137 stood up. The bleeding had ceased, and he could put weight on the injured leg (hidden behind the ripped trousers).

We tentatively walked on.

Kent countryside


We were following, for the last time, the Sussex Border Path, which up to that point had been brilliantly signposted. Sadly when we needed a post to show us the way to a cache 300 feet away, it was missing. No obvious track through farmland, and with some way still to go, we abandoned our search before it really got going. We knew we were getting close to our destination though as the cache belonged to a series entitled “Sandhurst Cross Circular Walk”.

The route took us through a farm. Clearly the farmer had had trouble with hikers, as there were a plethora of “Keep to the Path”, “Close the Gate” type signs. However the farmer had failed to mark the signpost clearly as we approached his back garden, and the fingerpost was angled for us to walk straight through his garden rather than a tiny path just by the fence line.

You can’t walk through Kent without seeing some of these!


It was shortly after this we found our first Kent cache on the walk. Hidden in tree roots. It had been well over an hour since our finding of the Sussex Multi so were grateful for an easy find.

Kent

Under the tree roots…

Our route took us through woodland, and around farm fields. We crossed far too many stiles for our liking (too tall for Mrs Hg137, too wobbly for Mr Hg137’s now-healing leg).

Kent

A Kentish stile!


And then we arrived at a Roman Road – and another cache. Again hidden in tree roots. Here though we had a long search. Lots of trees, and lots of roots.

Kent

Did the Romans leave this geocache for us to find ?

We were eventually successful and strode/limped purposefully the 1/4 mile into the village of Sandhurst.

A beautiful village green and fabulous clock tower. Our journey was complete.

Sandhurst, Kent

Sandhurst, Kent


Our final cache was under the clock tower, and we waited ages, for a bus driver to vacate the seat on which the cache had been placed.

Our final cache on this walk!


A fabulous setting for the end of our walk!

EPILOGUE

Sandhurst Geocachers Trail Trackable starts its quest

Sandhurst Geocachers Trail Trackable starts its quest

And so our walk was at an end. We finished in high Summer on a boiling hot day. We had started in the height of Winter, with ice on the ground. We had caught trains and buses. We had used many a long distance path including the Blackwater Path, The North Downs Way and the Sussex Border Path. We had walked beside canals, rivers and underneath a major flight path. We’d walked over Surrey’s highest hill, and walked through the claggy clay of the Weald. We’d undertaken quite a few Church Micros and learned about such diverse people as an Astronomer Royal and the founder of Ottawa. We even saw the Flying Scotsman!

The Flying Scotsman

The Flying Scotsman


We’d heard lots of birdsong and been lucky enough to see deer, a heron, an adder and a kingfisher.

Our route would have been approximately 60 miles if we had walked in a straight line but various constraints (Army land, Gatwick Airport, reservoirs) prevented this. Our convoluted route of 86 miles kept to footpaths where we could, avoided major towns and where possible picked a route with caches to find. Our route is visible here https://www.geocaching.com/track/map_gm.aspx?ID=6190539

An excellent adventure which we thoroughly enjoyed.

Sandhurst, Kent

As we noted on January 1, there is another Sandhurst, near Gloucester, a journey which we will undertake probably next year.

Do look out for that!

January 1 : The 2017 Challenge Unveiled

We are frequently asked by our friends, family and caching acquaintances whether we have another Annual Walking / Caching challenge.

Previous challenges (pre caching days) have included walking the South Downs Way, the Ridgeway, and the Three Castles Path. Our caching challenges have been to find 365 caches in a year (we now consistently find 400-430 caches per year) and to walk and cache the Thames Path.

This year we plan something different.

Something relevant to us.

Most of our readers know we live in Sandhurst (hence the blog title), home of the Royal Military Academy.

Few people know there are two other “Sandhurst”s in the UK. One is a small village just North of Gloucester, the other, a larger village, some miles East of Royal Tunbridge Wells in Kent.

Coincidentally Sandhurst (Berkshire) is roughly equidistant between the other Sandhursts (about 80-90 miles away by road, and 60-75 miles as the crow flies).

Our challenge is to visit at least one, and hopefully both, other Sandhursts during the year. We will cache our way to them, using footpaths in preference to roads.

This challenge will be harder than other long distant routes we have walked for three reasons :

i) surprisingly (!) the route does NOT have its own guidebook
ii) the route will not be waymarked so will have to self-navigate and hope our map-reading is adequate
iii) some footpaths/bridges are, from time to time, closed. We may not find out about these closures until we are faced with them and will have to problem solve a new route as we go.

Depending on how we fare with one of our Sandhurst visits will determine whether we attempt the other this year.

We will call our route “The Sandhurst Trail” – so watch out Sandhursts… we’re coming to get you!

July 2 : Sunningdale

Many of our recent caching trips had been some distance from home. We realised we hadn’t found many caches within 10 miles of our house for some time! Today, with bad weather forecast, was the morning to put that right.

Sunningdale Church

Sunningdale Church


A small series in Sunningdale, Berkshire was our target and what a fine series it was. We loaded lots of other Sunningdale caches into our GPS thinking that if we were quick finders (Ed : wishful thinking !), or the rain held off (Ed : even more wishful thinking!) we would have plenty to do.

Our first target was a puzzle cache in the ‘Famous Berkshire Residents series’. We had solved the puzzle before setting out, and realised the co-ordinates were near a handy parking space yards from the Sunningdale circuit. We parked up, and searched. Read the hint. Searched some more. Re-read the hint. Searched again. Nothing. The advantage of parking so close to the mystery GZ, was that we could have another attempt later.

On route to Coworth Polo

On route to Coworth Polo


And so onto the ‘Sunningdale Circuit’. This was a very well thought out circuit in a predominantly semi-urban area. Most of the route was by roads mainly minor, but did include the notoriously busy A30! There were some footpaths too, most of which were very passable given the rain we had had recently.

The first cache was near a bowling club, and we just about got away with finding the cache while bowlers were arriving at their venue. Our slight problem here, was the cache was embedded in a road sign, we initially looked at the wrong one, and then it was ages before we found the cache in the correct location. (This series wasn’t going to be easy).

Our next WAS an easy find. The cache log was hidden within a very life-like brick. With a small amount of rubble around it, it was very well hidden. Then to a gate. Here again we started our search at the wrong end, but once we had swapped ends, the cache was easy. A disappointing feature of the whole series was the smallness of caches, no space for goodies or trackables.

The gate lead to a footpath, which soon opened out to the Coworth Park Polo fields. Very scenic and totally unexpected given the narrow lanes we had been on earlier. Here there were supposed to be 2 caches, but one had been disabled since 28/5/16 and has yet to be replaced. The other a very devilish bison hanging in a tree. These caches are always really easy to spot when you know where they are, but until you spot them, every branch needs close examination. We felt a bit exposed here, as there was a fete (or similar) being set up and lots of people busy with all the tasks that fetes entail.

Coworth Polo - Fete

Coworth Polo – Fete


We walked around the fete field, and arrived at a beautiful footpath with overhanging trees. This was the best view all day, and best of all there was a cache to find. In amongst tree roots, but so many of the trees had long roots leading into the sunken lane.

Sunningdale

Sunken lane in Sunningdale

The sunken lane led to the A30, and its roar got louder as we approached. Just as stepped out on the A30 pavement we felt rain. At first just a little and we were able to use the many overhanging trees as shelter. A short diversion to find a cache right on the Berkshire/Surrey border and then back to the A30.

Berkshire/Surrey border

Berkshire/Surrey border

Surrey border

Proud of the county history


A very wet A30!

A very wet A30!

Our next cache find was straightforward, but as we removed the cache from its hidey-hole, the heavens well and truly opened. A nearby rhododendron bush yards from the cache provided us with shelter for some 15 minutes. During that time we saw several wet walkers, some very wet dogs, and even wetter runners go by. Most didn’t see us at all, hiding from the intense rain. We decided that we could get to the car by finding just 2 more caches and eventually when the rain eased, we set off again.

Our last footpath of the day was now quite wet and muddy, but we found the next cache fairly easily. Our final cache of the day – one of those false stone caches – was hidden behind other stone objects near to a Sunningdale church.
Not surprisingly given our searching prowess, we yet again we failed to find it on our initial search.

We arrived at the car, and gave the ‘Berkshire Resident’ one final look. But our look was cut short, when a large back cloud came ominously into view.

So with the exception of the puzzle cache, we found all the Sunningdale Circuit caches we attempted, although by the end of the morning it felt more like the Rainingdale circuit!

Caches found included :